Knowing Your RV: Class Differences

They always say variety is the spice of life.  And that is no different when dealing with RVs.  From a smaller fifth wheel to the bigger Class A motor homes, you have a lot to take in before you buy or rent an RV.  Do you need a quick refresher on the different types of vehicles?  I found a good excerpt from an article that may clear some things up if you are not sure.

People that are not informed about the RV industry are confused about “Class A” motorhome? “Class C” motorhome? Van campers? Isn’t there some way to keep RV shopping simple?

Class “A” or type “A” is the largest of all of the commercially produced motorhomes. The manufacturer starts with a chassis with an engine and transmission. On top of the chassis the motorhome is built.

Many luxuries and options tend to be put in any Class A motorhome. You will see many “slide out rooms,” which add floor space when utilized. A Class A with slide outs can feel as though you’ve stepped right into a good sized home.

These are also the most costly of all motorhomes, with prices starting at $50,000 and up to over a million dollars or better. Since they’re so large, it can be hard to locate an appropriate spot to park them. Also they are hard to drive, use more gas and are difficult to park. Many National Parks and US Forest campgrounds simply don’t have room for some of those rigs.

Class “C” motorhomes are smaller and are built on a van chassis. These are priced much lower than the larger Class A rigs. They are nice RVs though. Some Class C rigs have slide outs, but are a bit smaller than the Class A motorhomes.

Class C motorhomes are easier to maneuver; can park in public campground spots and often park at a Walmart up by the store. While Class A folks often tow a small round-town car (a “toad” if you will) to permit them to leave their big rig in camp, often Class C rigs are handy enough to be used directly for local transportation.

Costs to get a Class C motorhome, by industry estimates, start out at around $48,000. Insurance and fuel costs are substantially less for a Class C rig.

Finally, the least commonly sold, but not uncommon for its use, is a Class B, or “camper van.” Using a van chassis and body, the manufacturer tricks out the inside, adding sleeping, cooking, and teeny-tiny bathroom facilities. The roof of a Class B rig is often raised, giving occupants more headroom and accommodating cabinets and accessories.

Don’t count on towing much with a Class B rig. But they can go anywhere a car goes, parks easily, and takes up no more space than a passenger van, but don’t count on towing much with them. The fuel economy here might be better of all three . If you can drive a van, you are able to drive a Class B motorhome. Look to pay starting at the low $40 thousands to the mid $70 thousands for a new camper van.

For long-term RVing, it can be quite cozy inside a Class B rig. The other two camps will argue to whether Class A or Class B motorhomes are better for snowbirds and full-time RV living, by the reality shows both of them are used. Look for a fulltime RVer in a Class B? Maybe, but it will be a rarity.

Trying to make a choice? Consider renting one of every class for a quick road trip. Renting a motorhome can really demonstrate how things size up. You will soon see the difference in how these different rigs will suit your lifestyle.

So if you are looking to buy a new RV and are not sure which one suits your needs best, it might be prudent to try to rent the types you are interested in.  Let us know if we can help in any way!

[Source: New RVer]

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