Minnesota RVers, Do You Have Campground Etiquette?

Etiquette is always important, but certainly varies by circumstances.  The golden rule always applies, but depending where you are, you have to aware of your surroundings.  This is especially evident in a campground setting.  Thinner walls and more crowded areas with people you might not know can certainly affect how you should or do act.  I found a list of some reasonable rules for RV living from The Marine Web that you all might find interesting.

  • 1. Ground Rules: Usually when you register for a particular park, they give you a copy of their rules: following these rules is the first of such manners. These rules will specify when you should not be making noise, driving carefully around the park, rules related to cooking etc.
  • 2. Eliminating Pet Peeves: If you are bringing your pet along on your vacation, make sure it does not disturb or harm anyone else! Your dog will need to be taken care of, cleaned up after and kept on a leash to avoid bothering the neighbors at all. Remember, your dog may be well-behaved but you’ll still have to be careful.
  • 3. Rig Parking: In a number of cases, it will not be clear how to orient the rig on a site; the only guide being a hookup for electric and sewer. Ground rules will require you to stay on your side of the hookup and not encroach in any way. If all people are situated in the same way, everyone will get more camp site.
  • 4. Arriving Late: Try not to do that but even if you do, make sure you avoid disturbing your neighbors who might be trying to rest for a long day. This means not talking loudly, quickly parking your RV & setting up and reducing the general noise level while you do the necessary work.
  • 5. Connecting the Sewer: This will also require you to be discreet and to do it right. Usually, the connection should face the side where your neighbor has their patio area.
  • 6. RV Cleaning: Most of the time, campgrounds don’t allow you to wash your RV with open water in order to avoid muddy areas, high water bills and general wastage of water. They will give you a water bucket for the most minimal cleaning but even if you are allowed to wash your RV, be very careful not to waste the water or allow it to splash on someone else’s area.
  • 7. Don’t Trespass: When everyone is sharing the campsite, they’re all paying for their spots and it is against most rules to be on someone else’s spot without their permission and consent. One of the major campground etiquette requires you to treat your neighbor’s or someone else’s area as their personal property and stay away from it unless invited or permitted.
  • 8. Campfire: Before you make one, be sure that it is allowed in the regulations copy. Keep it safe and make it properly and most importantly, don’t use it as a trash can for your cans and other garbage.
  • 9. Be Tidy: Make sure you do that to keep your neighborhood clean; RV vacationers tend to be laid back but being dirty and sloppy is very hard to deal with so don’t be messy.
  • 10. Treating others: Whenever you are unsure of any campground rules, try putting yourself in the other person’s shoes and act only if you’ll like to be treated in the same manner. Otherwise, don’t!

I know there has to be some funny stories out there where maybe people didn’t use as much etiquette as the list above might suggest.  Leave your stories and comments below!

[Source: Marine Web]

 

 

Facebook for Campgrounds

The internet has given the world a pulse on what’s going on in our area as well as areas foreign to us.  This has allowed us to be able to connect to not only people, but to places.  Finding out about attractions and different areas as easy as clicking a button.  Even Social Media such as Facebook can be good for not only keeping up with friends and loved ones with comments, pictures and posts, but catalog our trips as well.

With all this additional information at the consumers fingertips, it is no surprise that even campgrounds are getting involved in order to reach their ever widening customer base.  While most campgrounds already have their own websites to tout their business, Social Media networks such as Facebook have largely gone unused up to this point.  But luckily BigFamilyVacation LLC has developed a Facebook application that allows for the company to combine the informational aspect of their personal website with a more friendly, interactive nature of Facebook.  The ability for people to post personal comments and pictures allow perspective patrons to get a more personal view than they might be able to get somewhere else.  The application also has a place for you to enter the zip code of your destination and it will produce all of the campgrounds in the area to give a traveler a better idea of what resides in the particular area.  The “Campground” application contains over 1,400 campground listings (including phone numbers, addresses and photos) from the website www.greatrvspaces.com to assist the user in their decisions.  Don Sumner from BigFamilyVacation LLC added:

“We know that there are now many thousands of people who are enthusiastic RV travelers, who regularly use Facebook to keep in touch with friends and family, such as kids and grandkids, while on the road. We think this application will provide a great resource to help them plan where to stay at their next destination.”

Have you used this application before?  Do you think it would be something that you would find helpful on your next vacation?  Leave a comment below and let us know!

[Source: American Banking News]

Pet Rules of the Road

Traveling with pets can be difficult and expensive.  Extra fees for taking them on airplanes and deposits at hotels (if they allow pets at all) can be cumbersome.  Not to mention if you leave them at a kennel, the cost of your trip can skyrocket.  RVs allow for more freedom when it comes to pets, although it is necessary for you to properly prepare yourself and your RV to have them as travel companions.  Pedata RV Center has recently released a list of 8 safety tips for you and your furry friends.

1. Can your pet travel? If your pet has never traveled try a short road trip before heading out on a long vacation. Some animals have a hard time traveling and will actually become sick. Discover this before you are hours from home

2. Check your pet’s tags. They need to be updated prior to departure if any of the information is old.

3. Make sure that your pet’s tags include a cell phone or other number that will actually be accessible to you while on the road.

4. Consider other identification devices like the chips that can be implanted in order to find a lost pet.

5. Have the appropriate health certificate. Taking your pet across state or international border lines requires a health certificate signed by a veterinarian.

6. Verify that your pet will be welcome at your final destination before leaving on your trip.

7. Bring a portable kennel for times when your pet will be left unattended.

8. Always keep your pet leashed. If you have a pet that you frequently allow unleashed remember that you are in new territory with unknown distractions and stimulants. Introduce a leash in unknown circumstances. Better safe than sorry.

Do you bring your pets along with you on your trips or board them somewhere local?  Leave a comment below and let us know!

 

5 Tips for Motor Home Renters


 

Planning a trip across the country or just to a place too beautiful to fly over?  Maybe traveling in a RV is the way to go.  There are a number of benefits to traveling long distances in a motor home.  Benefits include, however are not limited, to convenience and general comfort.

Even with all the wonderful stories people read about RV excursions, people seem to still be wary of this pastime.  One of the biggest concerns is the cost of buying an RV.  If you are interested in traveling by RV, although cannot afford the cost of owning one, you may want to think about renting one.  Keeping that in mind, if you are not careful motor home rentals can get expensive.  Below are a short list of some tips to think about when renting an RV:

Be aware of All Of Your Options

First, knowing all of your options is of the utmost importance.  Exhaust all of your options in terms of local RV rental providers.  They usually have multiple businesses to pick from.

Next, inspect the kinds of motor homes available for rent.  For comfort, as well as safety, secure a large enough RV that can comfortable seat everyone in your group.  For example, you wouldn’t try to fit a party of nine people into a RV built for six.  Also look at features, such as number of electrical outlets, onboard television, movie players, and so forth to maximize the enjoyment had on the trip.

Research Rental Costs

If you want to reduce the cost of your next outing, always compare prices.  In addition to comparing the average rental price for different businesses, also look at the various motor homes.  You want to get the most out of your money, so after choosing the size of the RV, being selective on additional features may allow you to trim in areas you don’t need.

Read All Fine Print

When renting an Motor home, you’ll be required to sign a agreement.  This agreement is comparable to one that you would sign if you were renting a car.  With that being said, never believe that all rental contracts are the same.  Always fully read an RV rental contract, including the fine print.  Never sign anything that appears too suspicious.  When in doubt, ask to take the contract home and review it first.

In keeping with reading all fine print, it is important to know all Motor home rental rules and restrictions upfront.  Often, these policies and restrictions are highlighted on a rental contract, although there is nothing wrong in getting additional information.  Make sure to be aware of rules that limit the number of people allowed , age requirements for children, and so froth.

Be Cautious With Use

Being cautious is an essential piece of renting an RV.  If you are not watchful, you may be financially responsible for any damage that occurs.  Some tips may be to keep food and drinks covered or in spill proof containers while moving, don’t make foods while driving that may cause harmful stains, and so forth.  Also, for those who have kids, be sure to set some ground rules.  Making sure you are cautious on the road is very important, especially dealing with underpasses and stopping at your campground.

Returning On Time is Important

Returning your rental on time will allow you to keep the cost of your rental low.  Late rentals may incur late charges.  These late charges, should they exist, should be outlined on the motor home rental agreement.  If you know your behind schedule and won’t make it in time, be sure to contact your motor home rental company to inform them of the delay as soon as possible.

In closing, RV renters are encouraged to look at all of their rental options, research prices,  examine rental contracts, use caution, and return their RV rentals on time.  These steps, when properly executed, can not only help to improve the overall quality of your next RV trip, they can also help to keep the expenses associated with that vacation a little more reasonable.  How have your experiences been with renting RVs.  Share your stories below in our comment section!

 

New Accessory: My Camper Kitchen

Have you ever pulled up to your campsite after a long day of driving, get ready to start cooking and remember you forgot the foldable table or utensils?  Just like in your kitchen at home, there are many parts and pieces that can be forgot or go missing if not properly cared for.  Certainly can be frustrating.  In comes a new product designed for RVs and camping in general to help out with such an instance.  The “My Camp Kitchen”, is a one stop shop for all your cooking and grilling needs (minus the grill of course).  Compact design and the ease to assemble should make this a very popular holiday gift this season.  The following is a video put together by the website in order to show how portable and easy this outdoor cooking set is:

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4vVIK6O94o

No more dragging a picnic table over or worrying about the sturdiness of your favorite folding table anymore.  Not only that, but this wonderful package also has storage for tupperware and even non-perishable foods.  As you can see in the video, this piece also has room not only to prepare your foods, but also for a single burner for those jobs that cannot be completed on the grill.

How well do you see this product fitting into your RV travels?  Leave a comment below and let the rest of us know!!

[Source: My Camp Kitchen]

 

Upgrading Your TV

Entertainment is a huge part of the RV experience. In the world of constantly changing technology, it stands to reason that you will at some point have to switch to a flat screen in your RV at some point.  While basic tube TVs took up a lot of room, the newer thinner ones most likely are in a different shape than your previous one.  In an RV, this could be a bit trickier than switching out your TV at home.  Even though this change might seem like a big task, once completed it will only increase the enjoyment that you get out of your RV.  Check out the video below for some helpful hints on upgrading you entertainment system from a standard tube TV to a newer, flatter one.

 

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JDScZX1POY&feature=player_embedded

 

Have you had to make this change in your RV recently?  Have any comment or suggestions for those looking to upgrade!  Leave it below.

Other Features to Consider with a New RV

On first observation of a new or used RV before we buy, we tend to focus our attention to such things as floor plan, room size, closet and space for storing, number of slides, appliances, entertainment and communications equipment, function of plumbing and electrical systems, heating and cooling capacity, etc.  Trust me, all of these things are very important when taking the steps to buy an RV.  But while these things are important, you need to make sure you focus on other aspects of the vehicle as well.   So when you’re shopping for an RV, don’t forget to check out these small but critical features:

  • Lie on the beds to see if they’re comfortable and long enough. RV manufacturers are forced sometimes to shorten the length of normal measurements in order to satisfy the amount of space they are dealing with. Take the case of the queen size RV bed.  While a normal queen is 80 inches long, in an RV, that same bed might be only 74-75 inches.  While you might not think thats a huge deal, if you happen to be over 6 feet tall, it certainly could cause problems.
  • Along with the bed size, make sure you are comfortable with the size of the couch. Couches may also be undersized to fit the compact space of an RV. If you enjoy stretching out on the couch to watch TV or perhaps a movie, this could be a problem.
  • It may also be wise to check out the dimensions of the shower inside the RV. If your elbows constantly bump the walls or you need to crouch down to get your head under the shower head, you’ll wish you’d chosen an RV with a larger shower. Same goes for the toilet.  It is important to test these areas out so you don’t run into problems after you have purchased your RV.

It doesn’t need to be overstated that comfort in these areas are really important.  What were the other things you looked for when you bought or were searching for an RV?  Leave a comment below and let us know!

RV Recipes at 100

As the 100 year anniversary of the RV is upon us, its time to look back on all the aspects of RV life that have allowed for the continuing success of the recreational vehicle.  In commemoration of this milestone, a Texas author named Evada Cooper has put together a collection of 100 recipes from all over that encompass the life inside an RV.  Evada and her husband, Terry, run an online RV academy called MobileRVacademy.com that offers a variety of web seminars and instructional DVDs.  Along with the recipes, the book also includes many tips and stories from their vast knowledge of RVs.  They set out to make a book that men and women could both use in the RV or at a campground.

She started soliciting recipes from the RV community this spring for inclusion in the cookbook. Whether they are old-time family favorites or non-traditional camping fare, she said she wanted any fun recipe that RVers would like to share.

In addition to recipes, RVers were asked to submit brief bios extolling their love of RVs and roaming the nation. She targeted the members of national RV clubs and organizations, the people who would most appreciate a centennial celebration of the lifestyle.

So along with all of the recipes she gathered there is a wealth of information to be had by all.  RVing is a culture within itself and deserves to be celebrated on this historic occasion.  But with the help of Mrs. Cooper, the stories she tells should allow for future RV users to not only cook wonderful, RV-friendly meals, but be able to get a feel of this wonderful pastimes history.

Do you have any RV recipes you would have submitted had the author asked?  Share them with your friends at RVing With Pleasure!  Leave them below in the comment section.

[Source: RV Business]

 

RVers Avoiding Costly Public RV Campgrounds

 

Owning and maintaining an RV can become very expensive. Between the purchase, upkeep and escalating gas prices, it can be difficult in these tough times to save the money necessary to enjoy what is supposed to be a “recreational vehicle”.  Another caveat added lately has been the rising prices of staying at a public campgrounds.  While staying at a public campground has been popular due to these costs, the rising costs added in with the lack amenities has begun to rub RV owners the wrong way.  Last week, a survey was done for the RVtravel.com newsletter regarding the escalation in prices of these campgrounds. While the figures might surprise you, it is fairly obvious that these prices are beginning to become a hindrance to travelers.

According to the RV News Service, the survey was prompted by RVtravel.com Editor Chuck Woodbury’s recent experience of coming upon two California state parks where the fee for primitive campsites — those with no utility hookups — were $35 a night. “My reaction was that it was too much,” he wrote. “The park system, of course, is trying to raise more money to keep its parks open. But I wonder if they have priced themselves out of the market.”

More than 95% of the recreational vehicle enthusiasts who responded to the survey said they would never pay — or probably never pay — that much to stay in a public campground. “Look at it from this perspective — $35 per night equals $1,050 per month,” one reader commented. “Would you pay that to rent a house with no walls, no water, no electricity, no toilets?”

 

While the point is made that it is necessary for the parks to raise revenue to continue to provide the space for such vehicles, Mr. Woodbury’s statement regarding pricing RV owners out of the market is a valid one.  How can a part-time RV user justify these costs added on to the plethora of other charges incurred by owning your dream?

Would you spend $35 a night to stay in what is described in the article as a “primitive campsite’?  Do you have personal stories or comments about a situation like this you would like to share?  Share your comments below!

[Source: RV Business]

 

Mark’s RV Garage Volume 1

I don’t know about you, but I’m not ready to start my day without a nice hot shower followed by a nice breakfast.  Many modes of transportation and trip taking make these things difficult if not impossible without the security of a hotel room.   But that is why you have an RV, so you don’t have to worry about these things.  Along with this luxury comes great responsibility.  Maintenance of your RVs water heating system, while tedious at times, is imperative for its functionality and preservation.  In Mark Polk’s first edition of Mark’s RV Garage, he discusses this topic in depth. When the water system is not in use, it is necessary to drain the stagnant water in order to keep bacteria and other minerals from corroding your system.  In the episode, he uses a product called the Tank Saver in order to clean out the sediment from the system.  I stumbled across this video and wanted to share the tips he gives on maintenance of the system and how to avoid such problems.

Do you do your own regular maintenance or do you have a professional look at it?  Make sure to leave a comment below!

[Source: RV Videos]