Upgrading Your TV

Entertainment is a huge part of the RV experience. In the world of constantly changing technology, it stands to reason that you will at some point have to switch to a flat screen in your RV at some point.  While basic tube TVs took up a lot of room, the newer thinner ones most likely are in a different shape than your previous one.  In an RV, this could be a bit trickier than switching out your TV at home.  Even though this change might seem like a big task, once completed it will only increase the enjoyment that you get out of your RV.  Check out the video below for some helpful hints on upgrading you entertainment system from a standard tube TV to a newer, flatter one.

 

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JDScZX1POY&feature=player_embedded

 

Have you had to make this change in your RV recently?  Have any comment or suggestions for those looking to upgrade!  Leave it below.

RVers Avoiding Costly Public RV Campgrounds

 

Owning and maintaining an RV can become very expensive. Between the purchase, upkeep and escalating gas prices, it can be difficult in these tough times to save the money necessary to enjoy what is supposed to be a “recreational vehicle”.  Another caveat added lately has been the rising prices of staying at a public campgrounds.  While staying at a public campground has been popular due to these costs, the rising costs added in with the lack amenities has begun to rub RV owners the wrong way.  Last week, a survey was done for the RVtravel.com newsletter regarding the escalation in prices of these campgrounds. While the figures might surprise you, it is fairly obvious that these prices are beginning to become a hindrance to travelers.

According to the RV News Service, the survey was prompted by RVtravel.com Editor Chuck Woodbury’s recent experience of coming upon two California state parks where the fee for primitive campsites — those with no utility hookups — were $35 a night. “My reaction was that it was too much,” he wrote. “The park system, of course, is trying to raise more money to keep its parks open. But I wonder if they have priced themselves out of the market.”

More than 95% of the recreational vehicle enthusiasts who responded to the survey said they would never pay — or probably never pay — that much to stay in a public campground. “Look at it from this perspective — $35 per night equals $1,050 per month,” one reader commented. “Would you pay that to rent a house with no walls, no water, no electricity, no toilets?”

 

While the point is made that it is necessary for the parks to raise revenue to continue to provide the space for such vehicles, Mr. Woodbury’s statement regarding pricing RV owners out of the market is a valid one.  How can a part-time RV user justify these costs added on to the plethora of other charges incurred by owning your dream?

Would you spend $35 a night to stay in what is described in the article as a “primitive campsite’?  Do you have personal stories or comments about a situation like this you would like to share?  Share your comments below!

[Source: RV Business]

 

Choosing a Campground

 RV campgrounds are a great place to have fun, park your RV, relax, or go on an adventure. Although if you are unfamiliar with these places they may be confusing, but don’t let that ruin all the wonders they have to offer.  We can’t guarantee that every campground will be the same, but here are some things you should look for when choosing where to park your RV.

There are two main styles of campgrounds, private or public.  Public campgrounds are usually at state parks, national parks and forests, BLM areas, and Army Corps of Engineers. The reputation and offerings are pretty consistent within these similar types of campsites.  As opposed to private campgrounds which may have more amenities than its public counterparts, but may also be more expensive to counteract these upgrades.

Something to keep an eye out for at both types of campsites, is what kind of services do they offer. Do they have electric and 50amp hookups? Do they offer clean water and sewer removal? These are probably the two more important questions to find the answers to. With others offering onsite pools, wireless internet and cable TV, please be sure to ask as many questions as possible to know your campground.  Don’t forget about Fido! Even though these days it’s rare to find, some campsites still don’t allow pets of any kind!  Be prudent though.  Look around and determine if the owners take care of the grounds, keep their site clean and waste-free, and don’t be scared to ask some of the present tenants about their experience.

If you are still not sure about your selection, several organizations are dedicated to rating campgrounds, such as AAA, Trailer Life, Woodall’s and Wheelers. See what the experts have to say about your choice in campground. According to www.about.com, AAA “maintains a continuous program to examine and evaluate every campground listed in its AAA CampBooks. Unfortunately, only Private camps are typically rated, but as we mentioned earlier, public camps are reliably consistent.

Still lost? We can help you decide where to stay!  Leave us a comment below about your recent campground experience and let us know which type you prefer.