RVing with Pets and Children

Having kids doesn’t mean that you have to give up the RV lifestyle, and being an RVer doesn’t mean that you can’t adopt that dog that you’ve been longing for. There are some considerations to keep in mind when you have kids and dogs on the road, but by and large, pets and children can love the open road as deeply as you do.

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Caring for Children on the Road

Children do tend to thrive on stability, having the same friends for more than a few days at a time, so you don’t find a lot of full-time RVers on the road, but it’s hard to find a child who doesn’t enjoy heading to a new campground every month, spending every summer exploring lakes, rivers and roadside attractions.

Scheduling a few big trips a year with a few weekends out here and there is generally going to be your best bet at providing both stability and adventure in your child’s life. Summer, Winter and Spring break are all a great opportunity to spend a week in the mountains or traversing Old Route 66.

Caring for Pets on the Road

It might not be a bad idea to look for a smaller pet. Even if you have a large RV, it’s tough on a big dog to always be cooped up inside of the vehicle. As much as they’ll love exploring hiking trails with you, the time spent in between stops can be very stressful for a larger animal.

If your pet has special dietary concerns, then make sure to stock up before you take off for a trip. Don’t assume that every small town in the country has what you need to feed your four legged friend.

The open road calls to us all at some point or other, whether you’re an adult, a child, a dog or a cat. The freedom and thrill of waking up in a new town every morning, of exploring your home country has universal appeal. As long as your pet or child has all of their needs taken care of, then there’s no reason not to take them out on the road with you.

Camping Essentials for the RVer

When you take your RV out into the great outdoors in order to get a little closer to nature, it’s easy to take for granted that you’re really out there in the middle of nowhere since you’ve brought your home with you. The camping essentials are still just as necessary when you’re out in your RV as when you’re out in a tent. Here’s what you absolutely need to bring with you if you’re going to be spending a weekend in the woods:

A Flashlight and Plenty of Batteries

It’s a simple matter of safety that you’re going to want to bring a light and enough batteries to last you. You never know what will happen.

Plenty of Clean Water

Even if your campsite has a water source, it’s a good idea to bring several gallons of your own. If the water source at the campsite gets contaminated somehow, then you need to have a fallback plan.

Dry Towels

Dry towels really are endlessly useless when camping. From using them for bedding to drying off to laying out a picnic lunch on them, towels are endlessly versatile little lifesavers.

A First Aid Kit

This goes without saying, but it’s important enough to say it anyways: you need to bring a first aid kit and make sure that it’s well stocked before you head out. The kit needs to contain bandages and disinfectant as well as pain pills, smelling salts and medical tape. Be prepared.

Canned Food

Chances are you’ve brought a lot of hot dogs and marshmallows with you, but if you find yourself with a flat tire or needing to wait an extra day in the woods for any reason, you’ll need to eat, so bring canned food just in case you get stuck.

When camping, one’s motto should be Safety First. Camping is supposed to be fun, but it’s hard to enjoy yourself if you’re not prepared, so just make sure that you have all the supplies you need in your recreational vehicle.

Simple Tips For Organizing Every Part Of Your RV

Staying organized in your Minnesota RV requires just a few pieces of specialized equipment. You don’t have to invest in expensive custom storage solutions when you tackle each part of the RV with an organizing plan.

Kitchen and Living Area

  • Use your microwave and oven as extra cabinets when you’re moving. Boxes of cereal or airtight containers full of rice can easily slip into these appliances when they’re not in use.
  • Invest in a big roll of non-stick shelf liners. These liners will keep dishes from slipping out when you’re driving, but they can also be used between plates and bowls to keep a stack from tipping over.
  • Invest in multi-purpose appliances to save space.
  • Hanging wire baskets or suspended shelves under the upper cabinets to hold cookbooks or other relatively flat items.

Bedroom and Bathroom

  • Use the walls of the bathroom and shower stall to expand storage for hair care products and other small items. A plastic shoe hanger with suction cups can hold half a dozen different shampoos and conditioners without cluttering up shelves and countertops.
  • Expand your closet with extra rods or collapsing clothes hangers that allow you to store six or seven items in the space of one. Store any clothing you don’t use at least once a week in a sealed bag in your exterior storage area.
  • Stick with collapsible laundry baskets and hampers. They fold up into a tiny, flat disc when you don’t need them.
  • Cut down on personal items that aren’t useful. If you’re only on a short trip, leave extra blankets or your curling iron at home and focus on your vacation instead. Full-time RV residents can open a small storage unit near their favorite home base to keep heirlooms and other items they can’t carry with them.

Exterior Storage

  • Pack blankets, clothing, and other soft items into large plastic bags and suck out the air with a simple vacuum tool to save space while protecting the items from dirt and insects. Pillows and other puffy items can shrink tremendously when vacuum packed.
  • Divide the storage area into sections with spring-loaded dividers if it’s simply one large compartment. You need to keep your tools for repairing the RV separate from clothing and gifts for your family, unless you want grease and dirt on them.

Many of our models at our Minnesota RV dealership feature extra built-in storage options. Come tour our best models to find one that fits the needs of you and your family when on the road.

Becoming A Full Time RVer After Retirement

For us working stiffs, RVing in our new or used RV is largely a vacation thing. If you’re lucky enough to work on the Internet, you can go ahead and take off and go where you like when you like, but that’s simply not a realistic option for a lot of us. The dream of RVing full time isn’t so far-fetched on any retirement plan so long as you have an idea of how you’re going to make it work, and you’re willing to make the compromises that you need to make in order to stay on the road.

Keeping the House?

One of the big decisions that homeowners will have to make regarding retirement is whether or not to keep their home. The decision of whether or not you’re comfortable relying on an RV as your one and only home is a big one, but, there are other assets that will need to consider, as well. We need to expand this question to cover your car that you love, the boat, or that acre of land that you own. Selling off your assets might allow you to live like a King on the road, but it’s a total severance from the lifestyle that you lived while working, and not everyone is up for that. Weigh your options carefully and decide what you might want to keep (just in case) and what you might want to consider selling or giving away.

Adjusting to the Road Life

Being on the road all of the time can wear you down if you’re not ready for it. Before you decide whether or not you want to become a full time RVer in your golden years, take whatever vacation time you have and spend as much of it as you can in your RV so you can get a feel of what life on the road would be like.

Full time RVing isn’t for everyone, but if you feel that you are a true nomad at heart, then you may be ready to turn your hobby into your lifestyle.

Spending Valentine’s Day In A New RV

Valentine’s Day, February 14, is almost upon us, and what better way to get away from it all and get closer to your sweetheart than planning a romantic RV weekend in one of our amazing state parks! Just check the weather, make a reservation, put on some tunes, break out the chocolate, and it’s on!

Whether you’re specifically celebrating Valentine’s Day with your honey or just planning a much-needed getaway, Minnesota State Parks are great destinations. You can relax in the luxury of your Minnesota motorhome or travel trailer or head out for an adventurous day of skiing and snowshoeing followed by a yummy meal for two by the campfire! And if the RV is snugly stored for the winter, you can rent one of their camper cabins. Just be sure to check out the reservations page and book your room or site.

Before you head out, check out the forecast for the V-Day weekend and make sure you pack the appropriate clothing for the outdoor activities you have planned. (No comment on the indoor ones!) Then grab any equipment you might need, like extra blankets, an extra stove and fuel, and any sporting gear. Be sure your RV is prepared for the weather as well!

Then, put on some romantic music to set the mood for quality time under the stars. From Marvin Gaye to the calming sounds of the forest, there’s something for everyone.

And, no Valentine’s Day is complete without chocolate. Hershey’s has some very special recipes to share. How about the “Fudgy Chocolate Fondue” made in the Dutch oven? Or maybe just a steaming cup of hot chocolate?

Don’t be afraid to go overboard. After all, February 14 only comes around once a year!  What do you think is the most romantic spot in Minnesota? Let us know!

RV Campfire Recipe

As the best in the Midwest, Pleasureland RV Center is the place to go for all things related to RVing. With an extensive inventory of new and used RVs, you’re sure to find the perfect size and style to fit your travel agenda from one of the four Pleasureland RV dealership Minnesota locations.

Once you’ve made your choice of RV and are out and about on an adventure, one activity you’ll want to experience is cooking over an open campfire. Cooking on a campfire has the aroma of coffee wafting through the fresh air at breakfast, the fragrance of savory chili bubbling over the rim of the kettle at lunch, or the sound of a juicy steak sizzling on the grill under the stars.

There are plenty of delicious recipes available that will keep the fire burning and the coals hot with a variety of breakfast, lunch, and dinner creations. For a quick recipe that can be enjoyed anytime, try making up your own signature kabobs.

For breakfast, using metal or wooden skewers, place brown and serve sausage, wedge of orange, pineapple chunk, slice of potato about 1/4-inch thick, and a section of seedless green pepper. Place kabobs on a hot grill for approximately 12 minutes or until meat is cook through. While the kabobs are grilling, baste with your favorite flavor of fruit preserves. Turn the kabobs periodically and continue to baste. Warm up the remaining preserves and serve as a side for dipping.

When lunch or dinnertime rolls around, meat, vegetable, seafood or a combination of ingredients make a delicious meal. Place chunks of beef, chicken, shrimp on the skewer along with button mushrooms, slices of green bell pepper and zucchini, and onion. Cut pieces large enough to stay securely on the skewer but not too thick. You want the kabobs to cook evenly so all items are finished at the same time. Add any seasonings. If cooking seafood only, baste with butter to keep food moist. Cooking time on a hot campfire grill is approximately 15 to 20 minutes.

Whether you’re ready to invest in a new or used RV, interested in Pleasureland’s RV rental option, in the market for parts and accessories, or you need to bring your RV in for service, experienced staff and expert service technicians are standing by. Call for more information or stop by and see, firsthand, what’s on their RV menu.

Taking Your Furry Friends On The Road

If you’re taking your pets on new Minnesota RV road trips, you’re probably already savvy about how to plan your trip and care for your pets along the way. But we found a few reminders in Pets America’s Pet First Aid & Disaster Response guide and thought we’d share.

1. Plan ahead. Research Minnesota’s emergency vets along your RV route through the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society. You can search for clinics in other states as well. http://www.veccs.org/index.php?option=com_hospitals&Itemid=193&nationid=1&searchword=&rpp=12&stateid=21&action=do_searc

2. Get referrals ahead of time for reliable pet sitters at your destination. http://www.petsitters.org/

3. Make sure your pet wears identification tags at all times. Add a temporary tag with the local number at your campground.

4. Update your microchip contact information. If your pet has a microchip (of course they do!), then call your microchip company to ensure your contact info is up to date.

5. Talk to your vet about motion sickness. If your pet is new to travel, take a short ride to see how your pet reacts, and to find out if they’re prone to motion sickness. If so, talk to your vet about solutions.

6. Never leave your pet in the hot vehicle. Even when it’s a comfortable 80 degrees outside, the temperature inside the vehicle can reach 120 deadly degrees in a matter of minutes.

7. Use a crate or harness to secure your pet inside the vehicle. Pet seats give pets a comfortable place to sit while the harness secures them safely to a seatbelt. This restraint can save a life.

8. Take breaks. Enjoy the journey and take frequent breaks so both you and your pet can… stretch your legs.

For even more tips on pet care, visit Minnesota’s Veterinary Medial Association. (Scroll down to the bottom of the home page to find the pet tips.)  Let’s face it. Not every pet is destined to be a RV road warrior, but for those who are, these tips can make the journey safer so you can enjoy the adventure.

Minnesota RV Safety: Propane

Getting ready for a big roadtrip in your motorhome can be full of excitement and fun. In the midst of the packing frenzy, you must remember more than just the toothpaste and towels. Having propane is essential for your new Minnesota RV on the road. It’s also important to have the propane system checked out at least once a year. So whether you’ve had the RV in storage or you call it home, here are a few tips on being prepared when it comes to propane inside of your vehicle.

Why use propane?

Propane has many benefits. As far as fuels go, it is considered to be clean. It’s liquid petroleum gas and there is a lot of it! Its low price and wide availability make it an easy option for everything from cooking to hot baths. Because it’s so easily transportable, motorhomes can use it for many things. While it’s usually quite safe, there are important factors to consider when using it.

Precaution

The most important item that every RV should have is a propane detector. They can be bought at any home improvement store and can be assembled without expertise. Having difficulty with set up? Don’t be afraid to ask for help! If something were to go wrong it could save lives. Be prepared to immediately vacate the premises should the alarm go off. In an emergency, aside from calling 911, turn off the propane valve if possible.

Testing

There are a few tests that a technician can do for the whole system to ensure proper working order. The first is an operating pressure test, which is used to determine pressure amounts to the regulator during use.  Too much on either side of the normal range could create problems. Another good test is the timed drop pressure test. Doing this test will show if there are any leaks which no system should have. Once the leak is pinpointed, you will be good to go! The last is referred to as a lock up test that ensures the regulator is completely shutting. This test avoids pressure contamination which could cause an explosion.

These are great ways to protect your family and your Pleasureland RV. Taking these extra steps will remove any unknowns from the safety of your trip. You will rest easier knowing your propane system is good to go.

Have you had your system tested this year? Feel free to share your propane tips with us in the comments below!

 

Thanks to Gary Motley for contributing

Creating an Office Space in Your Minnesota Motorhome

Whether you are a seasonal Minnesota RV enthusiast, or have taken to the full timing RV lifestyle, you may find yourself having to log in a few work hours here and there during your excursions. Even though you might be able to leave the office behind this summer and take a few days off, you may not be able to completely leave the work load at home. It is important to have a designated space aboard your rig in order to stay organized and successfully complete any work duties. The Fun Times Guide has provided a list of a few things you may need to have a well equipped RV office.

Designated Office Area . You should find an area that you can set up all of the necessary components needed to efficiently get work done. This space should preferably be away from the common areas and places that get a lot of usage from your passengers. If you simply can’t find a place that is out of the way due to limited space, try to close off your RV office with a makeshift divider like a curtain or screen of some sort.

Cell Phone. While most of us already have a cell phone that we plan on taking with us, you may not have the right plan set up for travel. You will want to get with your cell phone provider and find a plan that has unlimited long distance and roaming anywhere in the country. That way you can talk on the phone for however long you like, however far away you may travel, without additional fees.

Laptop Computer. If you should need to access the internet while RVing in a remote area, get an internet air card that can be installed on your laptop. While you can access a WiFi network at most hotels restaurants and sometimes truck stops, you won’t always find one nestled in a secluded area of a campground.

Wireless Printer. If you plan on needing a printer while working from your RV, it is wise to get one that multitasks and allows for printing, scanning and copying. Set it up wirelessly to your laptop and you can print from anywhere in your RV or even outside your RV if in proper range.

Whoever said you can’t have fun and get some work done at the same time while RVing?

[Source: The Fun Times Guide]

Five Tips For Staying Organized This Summer

If you are looking for things to help organize pre-owned RVs Minneapolis Minnesota has an RV dealership with items to help you with this task, as does an RV dealership Canada. These are just a few tips, but with a little imagination, you can come up with more for your personal situation, especially if you have a smaller RV.

Keeping organized helps keep the RV from getting messy, and keeping a small space neat, especially if you have children, can be a full time job. Turn it into a part time job with these tips on staying organized.

Tip #1: Use a cooler and ice for drinks if you are staying in one place for a few days. This saves room in the refrigerator so you can pack it with enough food so that you won’t have to go to the grocery store every day. Plus, the ice keeps drinks — water, soda, beer — much colder than the refrigerator. This also keeps the kids out of the fridge and conserves energy. This is especially helpful if your refrigerator is running on gas.

RV Dealerships carry all kinds of parts and accessories to help organize your summer trips. Photo Credit: Pleasureland RV
Tip #2: Install under-the-table drawers. You can find these at most RV dealerships in the parts store. They are thin and are great for storing pens, crayons, kitchen gadgets and just about anything else that is small and likely to get lost.

Tip #3: Get wall bins to hold magazines, television clickers and other items that you may want to use every day, but don’t want laying around the RV. They can also hold mail, important documents and small items to keep the RV organized.

Tip #4: If you run out of space to store clothing and don’t want to keep pulling out suitcases, use hanging hammock nets under the overhead cabinets to store clothing, extra pillows and blankets.

Tip #5: To save space in the bathroom, use a tall, covered toilet paper roll holder to hold extra toilet paper. This will save space in the bathroom cabinets for other stuff that should not be left out.