Thinking About Becoming A Full-Timer in Your Minnesota RV?

If you’ve been living in the RV world for awhile now, I’m sure you’re familiar with the term “full-timer“. You may even have several friends who are currently living this lifestyle. But for those of you who are thinking about buying a new or used RV in Minnesota for the first time, this may be a new concept to you. Whether you already own a motorhome, travel trailer or fifth wheel or you’re thinking about owning one and moving your life to road full-time, there are some things you need to consider first.

First, let’s define the term. Full-time RVing literally means living in your RV 365 days of the year. Your RV, travel trailer or fifth wheel is your permanent address. For many people, full-time rving simplifies their life by living more economically. If you’d rather spend all of your time at a national park or campground, then full-timing is definitely a great way to do this.

It’s been reported that there are more than a million people currently living on the road in their RVs. It used to be that retired couples made up the majority of the full-time population, but more and more families, couples and even singles are being to join the community.

As with all things, there are a few downsides to becoming a full-timer. Now that I think about it, these may even be considered as more advantages to some… it all depends on your lifestyle, really. The first downside is you’ll have to part with your current residence. This most likely includes a large chunk of your personal belongings. Odds are, your RV is a lot smaller compared to your home. If you’re used to spending a lot of time with your family and friends who aren’t in living in the RV world, you’ll have to get used to seeing less of them. This is something you’ll need to prepare yourself for before making the decision.

If full-time RVing is the choice for you, I have one huge recommendation: stay connected. With this advanced technological world we live in today, it’s extremely easy to keep in touch with your family, friends and the world. If you have any questions about this decision, or you’re in the market for a new or used RV to take on the road, come by and see us. Pleasureland RV is happy to help with all of your RV lifestyle needs.

Why Not Customize Your RV Minnesota?

Wanting to amp up your RV’s look? How about giving your RV a makeover with a custom paint job! If you’re the type who wants to get noticed out on the open road and stand out in a sea of other RV’s at a campsite, then I know just the trick that will set yourself apart from the others. Depending on your style, taste and level of boldness, you can choose from a range of different types of custom paint jobs. Whichever one suits your personality and flair, you can be assured that your RV will transform from tame to quite the opposite. Need a little inspiration? Check out some of these customized RVs and their custom paint jobs that will have heads turning!

One option for your customization needs might be to choose a simple factory design. This look is common on many RVs, as it has a simple design that wraps around the mid-section of the RV giving it a nice, subtle touch without being over the top.

Pleasureland RV Center

Another more bold custom paint job option is to paint a mural or scene on the exterior of your RV. For the most part you will see these on the rear of an RV so that those driving behind can admire its artwork. However, if simply having a mural on the back of your RV simply isn’t enough, you can absolutely have one painted on the entirety of your ride!

How about showing off our favorite team, The Minnesota Vikings! These sports extremists know who they are rooting for and aren’t afraid to show it!

Whether you simply want to change your RV’s color, or you’re willing to take it to the next level and really go for a customized look with a personalized design, the options are endless. Don’t you think it’s time to take your RV for a ride on the wild side? Send us pictures of your customized RV! We wanna see ‘em!

RV ABCs: Fifth Wheels

The hardest thing do when it comes to buying or renting a new RV is determining which RV is right for you. For the last few weeks, Pleasureland RV has been going through the RV alphabet in order to help make that decision a little bit easier. So far, we’ve discussed three classes of motorhomes: Class A, Class B and Class C. Now let’s move on to the towable class of RVs starting with the Fifth Wheel.

Fifth Wheels

Description: Fifth wheels are the most spacious RVs available, but don’t let the size intimidate you, they are delightfully easy to handle. They are towed by pick-up trucks with a special “fifth wheel” hitch and generally have taller ceilings and more slide-out rooms with as many as four in some models.

2012 Dutchmen Infinity 3470RE

Let’s see how CampingEarth.com breaks down the advantages and disadvantages of Fifth Wheels.

As with any type and style of RV, camper, or travel trailer, a 5th wheel has its advantages and disadvantages. Its main advantages are:

  • Easy Towing because of the gooseneck hitch.
  • Spacious and roomy inside. A 5th wheel has lots of room inside. If the weather outside is inclement, there is plenty of room for everyone to be inside enjoying the amenities.
  • 5th wheel can be detached at destination which frees up the towing vehicle for excursions and trips around the area.

The main disadvantages are:

  • A towing vehicle, outfitted with a special package to house the gooseneck hitch is needed. Because most 5th wheels are heavy, the towing vehicle needs to be heavy duty. But, on the bright side, manufacturers have begun to introduce lightweight 5th wheels that can be pulled by smaller trucks.
  • The steps. Some people don’t like the bi-level design of a 5th wheel travel trailer and don’t like having interior steps that lead to either the master bedroom that is typically housed in the area of the trailer that sits over the bed of the towing vehicle (although this area is also sometimes the living room area). If interior steps are a problem, you may want to consider a travel trailer or consider a motorized RV.
  • The cost. Fifth wheel campers are the most expensive of the towable RV’s which can make them too expensive for entry level buyers. If you really have your heart set on a 5th wheel, consider purchasing a used 5th wheel. There are some very good deals available on “previously road tested” 5th wheels.

Ready to make a decision? Come down and check out on this beauties! If you still haven’t found the right RV for you, stick around. Next week, we’ll continue with the towable RV class and talk about travel trailes.

Jayco Trailer on a 1000-Mile Durability

 

2010 Jayco Eagle

Jayco is known for building high quality, high value and competitively priced products. Their travel trailers have a long list of standard features and several floor plans to choose from. But when it comes time to buy a new travel trailer, you’re probably going to want more than just luxury. You’re going to want to make sure you have a product that will last over time and endure all of your family’s various camping or road trips. Check out this video of a Jayco trailer undergo a 1000-mile duration test, and let us know what you think!

 

RV ABCs: Class C Motorhomes

Two weeks ago, we began working our way down the RV alphabet. If you’re in the market to purchase an RV, new or used, or just looking to rent an RV for an upcoming vacation, it’s important to have a general understanding of the various types.

RVs come in all shapes and sizes  and like everything else in life, there are ups and downs to each class of an RV. But I’m willing to bet you’ll have no problem at all finding the one that fits your lifestyle the best. In case you missed them, let’s do a quick recap of the two classes we’ve covered.

Class A Motorhomes. There are the big, square and boxy RVs that are considered the most luxurious due to their top-of-the-line ammenities. However, the biggest draw back to Class A’s is the fuel economy.

Class B Motorhomes. These RVs use a cargo ban as their base and are very easy to store. The biggest draw back to this class? Most likely the lack of a master bedroom. Because they are easier to store than Class A’s means they are significantly smaller. But if you’re looking for weekend get-a-ways or short road trips, then this Class may be just the one for you.

Today, let’s take another step down the RV alphabet and talk about Class C Motorhomes.  Think of Class C’s as a mini-motorhome.  You’ll get the same conveniences of a Class A in a scaled-down version and lower price. Though it’s technically smaller than a Class A, the Class C is equipped with full sleeping, kitchen, dining, and bathroom facilities.

 

Let’s see how The Fun Times Guide breaks down a Class C Motorhome.

Advantages:

  • It is somewhat easier to obtain service and warranty work on the driving portion of the RV than it is with a Class A motorhome. With a brand name cab and drive train, auto dealers can hardly say, “Sorry, it’s not ours.”
  • The smaller overall size can get you into secluded and more enjoyable campgrounds with plenty of beds to sleep the entire family.
  • Your mileage in a Class C motorhome may be a bit better than in a Class A, but not much.

Disadvantages

  • If your RV is one with the over-the-cab bed, it probably has a large window across the front of the RV. These are notorious for leaking water when it rains. I owned a used one and spent a good amount of time repairing water damage and sealing the window.
  • If you’re looking for open square footage, this probably isn’t the best RV for you. At the most, you may have one small slideout.
  • The ones that have a rear bedroom also have a long rear overhang beyond the rear wheels. You’ll get a heck of an excessive tail swing when you go around corners, you’ll be watching in the mirror on every maneuver to make sure you don’t tag someone.

Now that you have a basic knowledge of the three motorhome classes, maybe you’ve found the right fit for you!  If not, stick around. Next week we’ll take a look at fifth wheels! And remember, you can always come down and take a look at some of these beauties yourself! We’re more than happy to help you in your big decision.

RV ABCs: Class B Motorhome

Purchasing or renting an RV is a big decision, and it’s important that you fully understand the different types of classes of RVs. Last week, we talked about the advantages and disadvantages of Class A motorhomes. Maybe this was the type of RV for you, maybe it wasn’t! But as I’ve said before, there are so many types of RVs to choose from, and it’s important that you pick the one that is best suited for your lifestyle.

To recap, Class A motorhomes are the home-away-from-home, luxurious and large vehicles with top-of-the-line amenities. The major downfall though is the terrible fuel economy. Click here to read more about Class A motorhomes.

Today, let’s switch gears from the largest of the classes to the smallest. Class B RVs use a cargo ban as their base.  Storing these vehicles is much easier than a Class A and the difference in gas mileage is staggering. Let’s break down the advantages and disadvantages of this class.

Class B Motorhomes 

2008 Gulf Stream BT Cruiser

Advantages:

  • Many Class B RVs will fit right into a standard garage.
  • They make a great second family vehicle and the mileage will be quite a bit better than with Class A and Class C motorhomes.
  • Parking won’t be much of an issue since the typical Class B RV can fit into a mall parking spot.

Disadvantages:

  • You can forget the master bedroom. Most will have sleeping quarters provided by dropping a table or folding a couch. With the planned occupancy being comfortable for 2, even the ones that claim to sleep 4 will be cramped.
  • Many Class B RVs have such small interiors that if you turn around real fast, you’ll bump into yourself.
  • Everything is small in a Class B RV. Space is limited, so things like bathrooms and showers are squeezed into tight corners.
  • For entertainment, you might have a 9-inch TV and a car radio for a stereo. Life can be cozy for 2, any more than that and you’ll be tripping over each other. 

This RV class is perfect if you are looking for weekend get-a-ways or short road trips. Still undecided? Stick around. Next week, we’ll dive into a Class C.

The Smallest RV in the World

Photo Courtesy of BornRich.com

Leave it to the geniuses who created the all-in-one, coolest tool of all time to create an all-in-one RV system. Allow me to introduce the swissRoomBox™. This little bad boy turns any regular old minivan or SUV into a fully-loaded campsite. It’s made up of several modules that serve as containers, countertops, a stove, a sink, a table, a chair and bed frame and provides hot water, gas and electricity in 220V, 12V and 5V USB! Hard to believe that’s even possible, isn’t it? But according to the manufactuers, it takes less than five minutes to transform the modules into a shower, kitchen, bed and dining room. Did I forget to mention that no tools are necessary to do this? Check out the company’s video and see this pure work of art for yourself!

 

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cy3gKwirLk

RV ABCs: Class A Motorhome

When it comes to buying or renting an RV, there are many things you should consider. First and foremost, you need to decide what type of RV you are looking for. RVs come in all shapes and sizes and each class has its respective advantages and disadvantages. Here at Pleasureland RV, we want to make sure you find the perfect fit. So let’s take it back to elementary school and learn the ABCs of RVs starting with Class A Motorhomes.

Class A Motorhome

Description: Class A Motorhomes are big, square and boxy and are considered the most luxurious of all RVs due to their top-of-the-line amenities. You’ll often here people refer to Class A Motorhomes as their home-away-from-home.

2012 Winnebago Vista

Advantages: Class A RVs can be as long as 45 feet. With all of this space inside, they’re usually equipped with a rear master suite including a full bathroom with a glass-enclosed shower. The water closet may be in its own separate room, and there’s probably a washer/dryer unit on board to handle the laundry.

Today’s Class A motorhomes tend to have multiple slideouts. Some can expand to a width of over 14 feet. Large flat screen HDTV’s, surround sound systems, even dishwashers and ice machines are common options. The list of upgrades and options is almost endless.

Basement storage can swallow enough supplies to keep you on the road permanently. These are great traveling machines that let you drive comfortably all day and sleep comfortably all night so you can get up the next morning to do it all over again.

Disadvantages: For Class A RVs, fuel economy is a big one. With their boxy and large profile, you’ll be spending big dollars to keep a Class A motorhome rolling down the highway.

Once you get to your destination and set up camp, you’re pretty much stuck there. Unless you tow a car for local transportation, you’ll be staying put at camp. That is unless you want to put everything away, roll up the awning, and suck in the slide-outs so you can motor on down the road again.

If you’re timid about driving something this large, keep in mind that close area maneuvering is a learned skill.

[The Fun Times Guide]

 

So, is the Class A Motorhome for you? Maybe yes, maybe no. Stay tuned for the next two letters of the RV alphabet.

Knowing Your RV: Class Differences

They always say variety is the spice of life.  And that is no different when dealing with RVs.  From a smaller fifth wheel to the bigger Class A motor homes, you have a lot to take in before you buy or rent an RV.  Do you need a quick refresher on the different types of vehicles?  I found a good excerpt from an article that may clear some things up if you are not sure.

People that are not informed about the RV industry are confused about “Class A” motorhome? “Class C” motorhome? Van campers? Isn’t there some way to keep RV shopping simple?

Class “A” or type “A” is the largest of all of the commercially produced motorhomes. The manufacturer starts with a chassis with an engine and transmission. On top of the chassis the motorhome is built.

Many luxuries and options tend to be put in any Class A motorhome. You will see many “slide out rooms,” which add floor space when utilized. A Class A with slide outs can feel as though you’ve stepped right into a good sized home.

These are also the most costly of all motorhomes, with prices starting at $50,000 and up to over a million dollars or better. Since they’re so large, it can be hard to locate an appropriate spot to park them. Also they are hard to drive, use more gas and are difficult to park. Many National Parks and US Forest campgrounds simply don’t have room for some of those rigs.

Class “C” motorhomes are smaller and are built on a van chassis. These are priced much lower than the larger Class A rigs. They are nice RVs though. Some Class C rigs have slide outs, but are a bit smaller than the Class A motorhomes.

Class C motorhomes are easier to maneuver; can park in public campground spots and often park at a Walmart up by the store. While Class A folks often tow a small round-town car (a “toad” if you will) to permit them to leave their big rig in camp, often Class C rigs are handy enough to be used directly for local transportation.

Costs to get a Class C motorhome, by industry estimates, start out at around $48,000. Insurance and fuel costs are substantially less for a Class C rig.

Finally, the least commonly sold, but not uncommon for its use, is a Class B, or “camper van.” Using a van chassis and body, the manufacturer tricks out the inside, adding sleeping, cooking, and teeny-tiny bathroom facilities. The roof of a Class B rig is often raised, giving occupants more headroom and accommodating cabinets and accessories.

Don’t count on towing much with a Class B rig. But they can go anywhere a car goes, parks easily, and takes up no more space than a passenger van, but don’t count on towing much with them. The fuel economy here might be better of all three . If you can drive a van, you are able to drive a Class B motorhome. Look to pay starting at the low $40 thousands to the mid $70 thousands for a new camper van.

For long-term RVing, it can be quite cozy inside a Class B rig. The other two camps will argue to whether Class A or Class B motorhomes are better for snowbirds and full-time RV living, by the reality shows both of them are used. Look for a fulltime RVer in a Class B? Maybe, but it will be a rarity.

Trying to make a choice? Consider renting one of every class for a quick road trip. Renting a motorhome can really demonstrate how things size up. You will soon see the difference in how these different rigs will suit your lifestyle.

So if you are looking to buy a new RV and are not sure which one suits your needs best, it might be prudent to try to rent the types you are interested in.  Let us know if we can help in any way!

[Source: New RVer]

Check out the New Dutchmen Travel Trailer

Here at Pleasureland RV, we sell a wide variety of Recreational Vehicles.  Among the brands we carry is the Dutchmen.  They are known for their Fifth Wheel, toy and travel trailers.  I found this video that gives a good tour of the interior, exterior, and accessories that grace these beautiful RVs.  Among some of the features that are included on this RV include:

  • Smoother Aerodynamic Design
  • Power Adjusted Awning
  • Built-In Outdoor Kitchen Space
  • Improved Entertainment System with Indoor and Outdoor Speakers
  • 40% more Shelf Storage Space Inside Dutchmen
  • “The Dutchmen Den” for the Children

Check out the below video and come see PleasureLand RV if you want to take a closer look in person.  Leave a comment below and let us know what you think of the new Dutchmen Travel Trailer.